NB Politicus

New Britain Democrats Choose Candidates

Posted in Uncategorized by nbpoliticus on July 26, 2007

The Democratic Town Committee (DTC) met July 24th to endorse its candidates for municipal offices. An estimated 130 persons, including 42 Town Committee members, attended the endorsement session held at the La Quinta Inn reception room on Columbus Boulevard.

A five-member nominating committee issued a report with recommendations, information about all candidates and a 3-page party platform that identified key issues and noted the accomplishments of Democratic elected officials over the last two years. Committee members included Connie Wilson Collins, Carlo Carlozzi, Jon Bryda, Rosemary Klotz and Peter Spano.

Leading off the meeting Councillor At Large Jim Wyskiewicz won unanimous support for Mayor three and a half months after announcing his candidacy. He was nominated by his wife, Patty, who is a DTC member in District 1. Seconding speeches came from Connie Wilson Collins, Frank Gerratana and John Melescensky.

“This City is ready for a leader who stands for fiscal responsibility, a school system filled with opportunity, cleaner and safer neighborhoods, sustained economic development, and a “green” City Hall, ” Wyskiewicz said in accepting the endorsement. “This City is ready for a leader who stands for honesty, integrity, for high ethical standards who will restore decency and respect at City Hall.”

Wyskiewicz, a contracts administrator for UTC’s Hamilton Sundstrand in Windsor Locks, spoke of his experience in the public and private sector with over “15 years working in private sector business, from telecommunications to the aerospace industry.” His public service includes seven years on the Board of Finance and two terms on the Council.

Touching on his family’s deep roots in New Britain, Wyskiewicz recalled his grandfather, James F. Carlone, an active Democrat for many years. “He was an inspiration to me to get involved and give back to the community. I learned a lot from him, from his time on the Board of Tax Review, to his endless campaigning for Democratic candidates. His spirit and memories serve to inspire our contemporary campaign.”

In seeking the endorsement, Wyskiewicz cited three key issues he will discuss with voters, including sustain economic development, affordable housing and quality education.

The Committee also endorsed Treasurer Teresa Sapieha Yanchak and Tax Collector Fred Menditto for re-election. Sapieha Yanchak, a former Ward 4 Councillor, is the first woman to hold that office having been elected two years ago as a member of the Jakubowski slate. Menditto, first elected to be Tax Collector in 1975, has been re-elected in 15 consecutive elections.

In Council At Large endorsements, Majority Leader Mike Trueworthy, Council President Suzanne Bielinski and Paul Catanzaro won endorsements with newcomers Eva Magnuszewski and Paula Mele.

Trueworthy, who was first elected to the Council from Ward 2 and is completing a first term at large, said that his campaign will focus on the re-development of downtown, increased education funding from the state, customer service at City Hall and infrastructure improvements.

Trueworthy said the Democratic campaign should focus on “bringing new people in to grow as a people and a party.” He added that “the best way to do this is to show people what they can accomplish by being involved.”

Other endorsements included

City Council Districts (Wards)

District 1: Greg Gerratana and Ed Kirejczyk, Jr.; District 2: Tonilynn Collins and Adam Platosz; District 3: Shirley Black and Silvia Cruz; District 4: Larry Hermanowski and Phil Sherwood; Ward 5: Rolando Centeno and Lori Rocha.

Board of Education

Board of Education President Peter Kochol, incumbent Kevin Riley and newcomer Aram Ayalon

Board of Assessment Appeal

Francisco O. Cuin and Robert Wysocki

Constables

Alton Brooks, Dominic Paventi, Frank Smith and Joe C. Willis, Sr.

Related Stories and Information On Democratic Endorsements:

The Courant’s Monica Polanco had the coverage:
http://www.courant.com/news/local/nb/hc-nebdems0725.artjul25,0,7224078.story

Associate DTC Member Beau Anderson, one of the state’s leading political bloggers at Spazeboy, is providing excerpts of candidate remarks at the DTC’s June 28th Meet The Candidate Night. Excerpted candidate remarks may be seen at Beau’s site as Beau takes a well-deserved break from blogging. As of Wednesday 7/25 , the video remarks included Jim Wyskiewicz, Phil Sherwood, Shirley Black and Greg Gerratana

New Britain Democrats Choose Candidates

Posted in city government, Democrats by nbpoliticus on July 26, 2007

The Democratic Town Committee (DTC) met July 24th to endorse its candidates for municipal offices. An estimated 130 persons, including 42 Town Committee members, attended the endorsement session held at the La Quinta Inn reception room on Columbus Boulevard.

A five-member nominating committee issued a report with recommendations, information about all candidates and a 3-page party platform that identified key issues and noted the accomplishments of Democratic elected officials over the last two years. Committee members included Connie Wilson Collins, Carlo Carlozzi, Jon Bryda, Rosemary Klotz and Peter Spano.

Leading off the meeting Councillor At Large Jim Wyskiewicz won unanimous support for Mayor three and a half months after announcing his candidacy. He was nominated by his wife, Patty, who is a DTC member in District 1. Seconding speeches came from Connie Wilson Collins, Frank Gerratana and John Melescensky.

“This City is ready for a leader who stands for fiscal responsibility, a school system filled with opportunity, cleaner and safer neighborhoods, sustained economic development, and a “green” City Hall, ” Wyskiewicz said in accepting the endorsement. “This City is ready for a leader who stands for honesty, integrity, for high ethical standards who will restore decency and respect at City Hall.”

Wyskiewicz, a contracts administrator for UTC’s Hamilton Sundstrand in Windsor Locks, spoke of his experience in the public and private sector with over “15 years working in private sector business, from telecommunications to the aerospace industry.” His public service includes seven years on the Board of Finance and two terms on the Council.

Touching on his family’s deep roots in New Britain, Wyskiewicz recalled his grandfather, James F. Carlone, an active Democrat for many years. “He was an inspiration to me to get involved and give back to the community. I learned a lot from him, from his time on the Board of Tax Review, to his endless campaigning for Democratic candidates. His spirit and memories serve to inspire our contemporary campaign.”

In seeking the endorsement, Wyskiewicz cited three key issues he will discuss with voters, including sustain economic development, affordable housing and quality education.

The Committee also endorsed Treasurer Teresa Sapieha Yanchak and Tax Collector Fred Menditto for re-election. Sapieha Yanchak, a former Ward 4 Councillor, is the first woman to hold that office having been elected two years ago as a member of the Jakubowski slate. Menditto, first elected to be Tax Collector in 1975, has been re-elected in 15 consecutive elections.

In Council At Large endorsements, Majority Leader Mike Trueworthy, Council President Suzanne Bielinski and Paul Catanzaro won endorsements with newcomers Eva Magnuszewski and Paula Mele.

Trueworthy, who was first elected to the Council from Ward 2 and is completing a first term at large, said that his campaign will focus on the re-development of downtown, increased education funding from the state, customer service at City Hall and infrastructure improvements.

Trueworthy said the Democratic campaign should focus on “bringing new people in to grow as a people and a party.” He added that “the best way to do this is to show people what they can accomplish by being involved.”

Other endorsements included

City Council Districts (Wards)

District 1: Greg Gerratana and Ed Kirejczyk, Jr.; District 2: Tonilynn Collins and Adam Platosz; District 3: Shirley Black and Silvia Cruz; District 4: Larry Hermanowski and Phil Sherwood; Ward 5: Rolando Centeno and Lori Rocha.

Board of Education

Board of Education President Peter Kochol, incumbent Kevin Riley and newcomer Aram Ayalon

Board of Assessment Appeal

Francisco O. Cuin and Robert Wysocki

Constables

Alton Brooks, Dominic Paventi, Frank Smith and Joe C. Willis, Sr.

Related Stories and Information On Democratic Endorsements:

The Courant’s Monica Polanco had the coverage:
http://www.courant.com/news/local/nb/hc-nebdems0725.artjul25,0,7224078.story

Associate DTC Member Beau Anderson, one of the state’s leading political bloggers at Spazeboy, is providing excerpts of candidate remarks at the DTC’s June 28th Meet The Candidate Night. Excerpted candidate remarks may be seen at Beau’s site as Beau takes a well-deserved break from blogging. As of Wednesday 7/25 , the video remarks included Jim Wyskiewicz, Phil Sherwood, Shirley Black and Greg Gerratana

Sox Fever ’67: NESN Brings Back "Penultimate" Game After 40 Years

Posted in sports by nbpoliticus on July 10, 2007

In 2007 most fans of a certain age will tell you the most memorable, joyful days in Red Sox history had to occur in 2004 when the dominant Yankees lost to Boston in seven games. The Yankee collapse was followed by a sweep of the Cardinals, the other team the Sox needed to avenge for earlier heartbreaks. The 86-year-old curse ended.

For some of us old enough to remember, however, 1967 was and is the best, not just for one game or series but for a whole season: “The Impossible Dream.”

NESN knows we’re out here and they are making a big deal of the 40th anniversary of the 1967 Red Sox with TV specials and a CD documentary. The worst-to-first Red Sox, for years humbled by the Orioles and Twins in the 10-team American League, came out of no where to reach the World Series. It started on opening day in Yankee stadium when rookie pitcher Billy Rohr nearly no-hit the Yankees, helped by an incredible catch by Triple Crown winner Carl Yastrzemski in the bottom of the 9th. Expectations for an improved .500 season soon gave way to pennant fever. It built into August when that terrible beaning of local hero Tony Conigliaro (St. Mary’s High, Lynn, MA) occurred. With no divisional playoffs, the season all came down to the final day on September 30, 1967.

A senior at Lynn English High School in the fall of 1967, I and some classmates stood in long lines to get reserved grandstand tickets to witness the last game of the season, a matchup between Dean Chance and Jim Lonborg on an Indian summer Sunday at Fenway Park. In those days it was possible for ordinary folks, even kids from Lynn, to get seats by simply showing up early — a fact confirmed when a few days later I scored a $2 bleacher seat to see Game 7, Lonborg vs. Bob Gibson in the World Series.

NESN this month has re-broadcast the next to last game with Jose Santiago and Jim Kaat for the Twins pitching — a matchup the sports network called the “penultimate” game of the season. The real penultimate game for me , however, came on Sunday when I managed to be sitting in the right field grandstand midway between home and the Pesky pole.

My memory after 40 years isn’t that good of the game the Sox had to have for a tie or pennant win. I know the Red Sox prevailed over the Twins that day, then waited for hours as the White Sox and Tigers put each other out of contention. I think it was “Boomer” (George Scott, 1B) who got a big hit and Lonborg the victory. We stormed onto the field and I collected some dirt where Rico Petrocelli (SS/3B) patrolled and caught the final out. I can’t find the bag of dirt anymore, but I am sure it’s around somewhere compounding in value as a piece of Sox memorabilia.

So thanks NESN for tapping into the season and games that go down for some of us as the most memorable time to be a Red Sox fan. I may have missed Barry Bonds and the All-Star game this year. But I watched every pitch of Red Sox vs. Twins in a re-broadcast of the next to last game. NESN, knowing a captive audience is here, packed most of the commercial time during the re-broadcast of the next to last game promoting the CD that includes the clincher on the last day.

Sox Fever ’67: NESN Brings Back "Penultimate" Game After 40 Years

Posted in sports by nbpoliticus on July 10, 2007

In 2007 most fans of a certain age will tell you the most memorable, joyful days in Red Sox history had to occur in 2004 when the dominant Yankees lost to Boston in seven games. The Yankee collapse was followed by a sweep of the Cardinals, the other team the Sox needed to avenge for earlier heartbreaks. The 86-year-old curse ended.

For some of us old enough to remember, however, 1967 was and is the best, not just for one game or series but for a whole season: “The Impossible Dream.”

NESN knows we’re out here and they are making a big deal of the 40th anniversary of the 1967 Red Sox with TV specials and a CD documentary. The worst-to-first Red Sox, for years humbled by the Orioles and Twins in the 10-team American League, came out of no where to reach the World Series. It started on opening day in Yankee stadium when rookie pitcher Billy Rohr nearly no-hit the Yankees, helped by an incredible catch by Triple Crown winner Carl Yastrzemski in the bottom of the 9th. Expectations for an improved .500 season soon gave way to pennant fever. It built into August when that terrible beaning of local hero Tony Conigliaro (St. Mary’s High, Lynn, MA) occurred. With no divisional playoffs, the season all came down to the final day on September 30, 1967.

A senior at Lynn English High School in the fall of 1967, I and some classmates stood in long lines to get reserved grandstand tickets to witness the last game of the season, a matchup between Dean Chance and Jim Lonborg on an Indian summer Sunday at Fenway Park. In those days it was possible for ordinary folks, even kids from Lynn, to get seats by simply showing up early — a fact confirmed when a few days later I scored a $2 bleacher seat to see Game 7, Lonborg vs. Bob Gibson in the World Series.

NESN this month has re-broadcast the next to last game with Jose Santiago and Jim Kaat for the Twins pitching — a matchup the sports network called the “penultimate” game of the season. The real penultimate game for me , however, came on Sunday when I managed to be sitting in the right field grandstand midway between home and the Pesky pole.

My memory after 40 years isn’t that good of the game the Sox had to have for a tie or pennant win. I know the Red Sox prevailed over the Twins that day, then waited for hours as the White Sox and Tigers put each other out of contention. I think it was “Boomer” (George Scott, 1B) who got a big hit and Lonborg the victory. We stormed onto the field and I collected some dirt where Rico Petrocelli (SS/3B) patrolled and caught the final out. I can’t find the bag of dirt anymore, but I am sure it’s around somewhere compounding in value as a piece of Sox memorabilia.

So thanks NESN for tapping into the season and games that go down for some of us as the most memorable time to be a Red Sox fan. I may have missed Barry Bonds and the All-Star game this year. But I watched every pitch of Red Sox vs. Twins in a re-broadcast of the next to last game. NESN, knowing a captive audience is here, packed most of the commercial time during the re-broadcast of the next to last game promoting the CD that includes the clincher on the last day.

Summer Farm Report: Crops Are Coming In At Urban Oaks

Posted in Parks and Agriculture by nbpoliticus on July 8, 2007

Living in the city and organic farming/shopping are not mutually exclusive thanks to the Urban Oaks Organic Farm on Oak Street.

“We’ve started picking our own summer crops including French round zucchini and regular zucchini, and, of course, we’ll have more of our first picking of basil,” reported our friends at Urban Oaks on June 28th. “We also have some yellow summer squash from Massachusetts. We’re picking greens – including our glorious kales. Keep the kitchen cool by cooking up some greens rather than using your ovens.”

Oak Street New Britain may seem an unlikely place for a working farm that practices sustainable agriculture and produces lettuces, salad greens, tomatoes, fresh herbs and eggplant that chefs at fine restaurants favor. In 1999, however, Tony Norris and Mike Kandefer made Urban Oaks Organic Farm a reality. In the 1990s, mobilizing environmental clean up funds, grants and volunteers, Tony and Mike reclaimed the former Sandelli Greenhouse property at 233 Oak Street and created a working city farm utilizing their skills as certified organic farmers. The restoration of 15,000 square feet of greenhouses has allowed the farm to offer fresh greens and produce.

The nonprofit farm has been an urban revitalization success story second to none in New Britain. The presence of Urban Oaks is a positive force in a city neighborhood struggling with blight and safety issues. It’s been a gathering place where city residents and students can learn about sustainable and environmentally friendly farming. It proves that farming is not just an enterprise for the open roads and lower density of rural Connecticut.

And now here is your order form for the week of July 9th:

Welcome to the Urban Oaks Shopping Service!
Urban Oaks Organic Farm, 225 Oak Street , New Britain, CT 06051
Phone or Fax 860-223-6200, Email: urbanoaks@earthlink.net

Price list for orders to be picked up on Fridays from 3-6 (or on Saturdays from 10-1).

DEADLINE FOR ORDERS: TUESDAY, JULY10TH BY 12:00 MIDNIGHT

Please give us your name: ______________________and daytime telephone: ________

How to order

You may order in pounds (lbs.) or quantity (qty), for example, 3lbs. of Macintosh apples or 8 qty Macintosh apples. Everything is certified organic unless otherwise indicated.

CT-grown products are boldfaced. You may also pickup pre-orders anytime after 1 p.m. on Fridays (although, Sweet Sage bakery items will not be available until 3).

Urban Oaks Organic Farm Produce

___Edible Chrysanthemum $6/lb
___Scallions $1.95/bunch
___Finnocchio (bulb fennel) $5.75/bag – two per bag
___Red Bor Kale $3.25/bunch
___Scotch Kale $3.25/bunch
___Sorrel, French @ $6/lb
___Soup or Braising mix @$6/lb
___Swiss chard $6/lb – SALE – $5/LB
___New Zealand spinach $6/lb
___Dandelion greens $3.25/bunch
___Garlic scapes $6/lb
___Rhubarb $4.25/lb
___Edible blossoms $2.50/dozen
___French round zucchini @ $2.50/lb
___Hardneck garlic @ $9.75/lb

Basils @ $2.50/sandwich sized bag

___Sweet

Herbs @ $1.75/bag:
___Bay Leaf
___Fennel, Bronze
___Fennel, Green
___Greek Oregano
___Lemon Grass
___Thyme
___Mint, Roman
___Mint, Spearmint
___Sweet Marjoram
___Rosemary
___Garlic (Chinese) chives
___Sweet Cicely
___Winter savory
___Lemon balm

Parsleys
___Parcel $1.95/bag
___Italian (flat leaved) Parsley $1.95/bunch
___Curly parsley $1.95/bunch

Farm River Honey, Branford (not certified organic)

___Honey, Raw, 8 oz. jar @ $3/each

Certified organic eggs (NH)

___Extra large @ $4.50/dozen

The Bridge, Middletown (non-gmo, not certified organic but made with organic soybeans

___Tofu 15 oz. $2.35/each
___Amasake (rice drink sweetened by fermenting rice) 16 oz. @ $3.50
___Seitan 8 oz. @ $3.85

Abraham’s

___Hummus 8 oz. $2.70/each

Sunshine Burgers

___Sunshine organic Southwestern flavor vegan burgers @ $4.25/8 oz. package of three burgers
___Sunshine barbeque vegan burgers @ $4.25/8 oz. package of three burgers
___Sunshine organic regular original garden herb vegan burgers @ $4.25/8 oz. package of three burgers

NON-PRODUCE ITEMS

___Vinegar, Raw, unfiltered organic apple cider @ $4.49/32oz.
___Grateful Harvest Lime Juice @ $1.25/4.4oz. (made with organic ingredients)
___Volcano Organic Sicilian Blood Orange Juice @ $5.50/25.3oz.
___Matt’s Organic Orange Juice @ $7.95/56oz.

Bionaturae Whole Wheat Organic Pasta @ $2.50/1 lb. pkg.

This is the best tasting whole-wheat pasta you’ve ever had!

___Spaghetti
___Penne Rigate
___Fusilli

Organic butters (frozen)

___Cultured Sweet Butter @ $6.39/1 lb. pkg. (Organic Valley)
___European Style Butter (lower moisture, higher fat) @ $3.99/1/2 lb. pkg. (Horizon)

Natural Meats from North Hollow Farm, Vermont

These meats are from a family farm (the Carlsons) and are pasture-raised without
hormones, antibiotics, growth stimulants, etc.

___Bacon @ $8.49/one-pound pkg.
___Beef, Ground @ $5.69/ 1 lb. pkg.
___Beef, Porterhouse or Rib Steaks @ $12.39/lb
___Beef, Eye of the Round Roast @ $8.49/lb (about 2lbs.; preorder one week in advance)
___Hams @ $8.49/lb no nitrates, nitrites or MSG (about 4 lbs; preorder one week in advance)
___Hot Dogs @ $5.95/1 lb. pkg., no nitrates, nitrites or MSG
___Country style Spare Ribs @ $6.29/lb

Applegate Farms

___Bacon 8 oz., $4.25/pkg. peppered no nitrates, nitrites, etc.
___Bacon, Sunday organic $6.25/8oz. pkg

Organic Meats from Organic Valley

___Ground Organic Beef Patties – 2 per package (10.6oz.total) @ $6.29/each (these are great!)
___Whole organic chickens approximately 4-7 lbs. $4.89/lb

Equal Exchange Organic Fair Trade Coffees and hot cocoa (whole beans):

___French Roast @ $10/lb
___Breakfast Blend Decaffeinated @ $14/lb

SPECIALS — These are items we try to keep in stock if people keep requesting them

___Apples, Fuji @ $3.50/lb (38 lbs.)
___Avocado, Californian Haas @ $1.75/each (48 count)
___Beets, Gold @ $3.50/lb
___Beets, Red @ $3.75/lb (25 lbs.)
___Broccoli @ $3.95/bunch (14 count)
___Cabbage, Green @ $1.75/lb (40 lbs.)
___Cabbage, Red @ $2.35/lb (40 lbs.)
___Cabbage, Savoy @ $2.35/lb (40 lbs.)
___Carrots, bunched @ $2.50/bunch (24 count)
___Celery @ $2.95/bunch (30 count)
___Celeriac (celery root) $2.95/lb (25 lbs.)
___Garlic, softneck @ $4.75/lb (10 lbs.)
___Ginger, Hawaiianr @ $8.95/lb (5 lbs.)
___Grapefruit $2.25/lb (38 lbs.)
___Kiwi @ $.99/each (20 lbs.)
___Leeks @ $2.75/lb (20 lbs.)
___Lettuce, Green leaf $2.50/each (24 count)
___Lettuce, Red leaf $2.50/each (24 count)
___Lettuce, Romaine $2.50/each (24 count)
___Nectarines @ $2.95/lb (38 lbs.)
___Onions, Red @ $2.25/lb (50 lbs.)
___Onions, Yellow @ $1.75/lb (50 lbs.)
___Onions, Vidalia @ $2.50/lb (40 lbs.)
___Oranges, Valencia @ $1.95/lb (38 lbs.)
___Pears, Packhamt @ $2.25/lb (44 lbs.)
___Pears, d’Anjou @ $2.75/lb (38 lbs.)
___Plums, Black Amber $2.95/lb (22 lbs.)
___Pluots @ $3.95/lb (18 lbs.) [plum/apricot cross]
___Potatoes, Garnet Sweet @ $2.25/lb (40 lbs.)
___Potatoes, Red @ $1.95/lb (50 lbs.)
___Potatoes, Yukon gold @ $1.95/lb (50 lbs.)
___Potatoes, new White @ $1.75/lb (50 lbs.)
___Radish, daikon @ $2.75/lb (11 lbs.)
___Radishes, Red @ $2.50/bunch (24 count)
___Shallots, new with tops @ $6.50/lb (10 lbs.)
___Spinach @ $2.50/bunch (24 count)
___Summer (yellow) squash @ $2.50/lb (20 lbs. MA grown)

Other produce – These are new specialty items we could get if enough people pre-order!

___Apples, pink crisp (another name for Pink Lady) $3.95
___Apricots @ $3.75/lb (24 lbs.)
___Artichokes, Globe Jumbo @ $2.25/each (30 count)
___Asparagus @ $6.50/lb (11 lbs.)
___Bananas, Fair-Trade @ $1.15/lb (38 lbs.)
___Beans, Green $3.25/lb. (25 lbs.)
___Beets, Chioggia @ $2.95/lb (25 lbs.)
___Blueberries @ $8.25/8 oz. pkg. (12 count)
___Cabbage, napa $1.75/lb (35 lbs.)
___Cauliflower @ $4.95/each (12 count)
___Cherries @ $10/lb (18 lbs.)
___Croutons, seasoned @ $3.75/4.5oz. bag (12 count)
___Cucumbers @ $3.50/lb (20 lbs.)
___Escarole @ $2.25/each (24 count)
___Grapes, Red Flame Seedless @ $3.25/lb (18 lbs.)
___Lemons @ $3.25/lb (38 lbs.)
___Limes @ $4.25/lb (10 lbs)
___Mangoes @ $1.95/each (10 count)
___Melons, Cantaloupe @ $1.50/lb (9 count)
___Melons, Honeydew @ $1.85/lb. (20 lbs.)
___Mushrooms, Crimini @ $4.75/lb (5 lbs.)
___Mushrooms, Portabella @ $5.95/lb (5 lbs.)
___Mushrooms, Shiitake @ $13.75/lb (3 lbs)
___Mushrooms, Maiitake @ $17.50/lb
___Onions,sweet Wall-walla $1.95/lb (50 lbs.)
___Oranges, Mandarin $2.95/lb (25 lbs.)
___Parsley, Italian flat leaf $2.25/bunch (24 count)
___Peas, sugar snap (MA grown) $7.50/lb (10 lbs.)
___Peaches @ $3.75/lb (18 lbs.)
___Peaches, White @ $3.75/lb. (18 lbs.)
___Peas, snow (MA grown) $6.50/lb (10 lbs.)
___Peppers, Green bell @ $3.50/lb (11 lbs.)
___Peppers, Red bell @ $5.50/lb (25 lbs.)
___Peppers, Yellow bell @ $5.95/lb. (11 lbs.)
___Pineapples, Gold $5.50/each averaging 3-4 lbs. (6 count)
___Radishes, Watermelon @ $5.95/lb (10 lbs.)
___Squash, yellow zephyr @ $2.50/lb (20 lbs.)
___Tomatoes, hothouse @ $3.95/lb (11 lbs.)
___Watermelon $1.50/lb (8 count)

ALL OTHER PRODUCE WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE FARMSTAND

Sweet Sage Bakery by Kathy Duffy

___Baguette @ $2.50
___Morning glory muffins @ $1.75 (ALL MUFFINS ARE NOW $1.75/each)
___Challah @ $4
___Rustica @ $4 (no yeast)
___San Francisco sourdough @ $4 (no yeast)
___Three seed @$4 (no yeast/whole wheat flour)
___Norwegian farm loaf @$4 (no yeast/whole wheat flour)
___Rosemary walnut @ $4 (no yeast/w/whole wheat flour)
___Squaw (Molasses and oat) @ $4 (no yeast/whole wheat flour)
___Stromboli @ $4; roasted vegetables(peppers, onions, garlic, zucchini, eggplant with mozzarella cheese,
___Foccacia @ $4: greens tossed in a balsamic vinaigrette with mushrooms, roasted peppers and asiago cheese

Chapel Hill Muffin Company by Kathie Magzag

Kathie offers delicious heart-healthy Magic Muffins loaded with beneficial bran and Omega 3 fatty acids. Ingredients include: Oat bran, organic all-purpose flour, organic flax seed meal, wheat bran, oranges, brown sugar, eggs, buttermilk, golden raisins (optional), canola oil.

___Magic Muffins 6 @ $7 (in a clamshell)
___Orange/cranberry muffins 6 @$7

DEADLINE FOR ORDERS IS TUESDAY, JULY 10TH BY 12:00 MIDNIGHT

Summer Farm Report: Crops Are Coming In At Urban Oaks

Posted in Parks and Agriculture by nbpoliticus on July 8, 2007

Living in the city and organic farming/shopping are not mutually exclusive thanks to the Urban Oaks Organic Farm on Oak Street.

“We’ve started picking our own summer crops including French round zucchini and regular zucchini, and, of course, we’ll have more of our first picking of basil,” reported our friends at Urban Oaks on June 28th. “We also have some yellow summer squash from Massachusetts. We’re picking greens – including our glorious kales. Keep the kitchen cool by cooking up some greens rather than using your ovens.”

Oak Street New Britain may seem an unlikely place for a working farm that practices sustainable agriculture and produces lettuces, salad greens, tomatoes, fresh herbs and eggplant that chefs at fine restaurants favor. In 1999, however, Tony Norris and Mike Kandefer made Urban Oaks Organic Farm a reality. In the 1990s, mobilizing environmental clean up funds, grants and volunteers, Tony and Mike reclaimed the former Sandelli Greenhouse property at 233 Oak Street and created a working city farm utilizing their skills as certified organic farmers. The restoration of 15,000 square feet of greenhouses has allowed the farm to offer fresh greens and produce.

The nonprofit farm has been an urban revitalization success story second to none in New Britain. The presence of Urban Oaks is a positive force in a city neighborhood struggling with blight and safety issues. It’s been a gathering place where city residents and students can learn about sustainable and environmentally friendly farming. It proves that farming is not just an enterprise for the open roads and lower density of rural Connecticut.

Urban Oaks Organic Farm, 225 Oak Street , New Britain, CT 06051
Phone or Fax 860-223-6200, Email: urbanoaks@earthlink.net

Did Mayor Lobby Too Hard For His City Pension In Legislative "Rat"?

Posted in city politics and government by nbpoliticus on July 5, 2007

From the New Britain Democrat e-letter 4 July 2007

An amendment to give Mayor Timothy Stewart higher pension benefits for his employment as a New Britain firefighter failed in the waning days of the 2007 state Legislature despite Stewart’s personal lobbying of city lawmakers for its passage.

The amendment filed by State Rep. Sean Williams (R-68) was contained in a bill “updating the social security retirement age to reflect federal changes and concerning a retirement annuity program for municipal employees.”

The original bill was enacted as Public Act 07-211 without the provision that would have directly benefited Mayor Stewart The amendment in question is commonly referred to as a “rat” by legislators and lobbyists because the intent is usually to benefit one particular person or a small number of people without benefit of legislative hearings or fiscal oversight. Such obscure measures are often embedded in legislation with a broader purpose as was the case with the bill that became Public Act 07-211.

The late-filed pension language, which initially passed the House but ultimately failed in the Senate, stated that “any member of the municipal employees’ retirement system or any other municipal pension system elected to serve as an official of the state or any political subdivision of the state during the 1988 calendar year or thereafter may elect, during the time he so serves, but no longer than ten years, to continue his membership in said system.” The wording was specifically written to enable Stewart to claim fuller pension rights from the Fire Department for his 18 years of service. The Mayor does qualify for a pension, but could attain a much more lucrative deal if given more time in the system. He is currently on leave from his Fire Department position and serving his second term as Mayor. A more favorable and fast-tracked pension deal has been a goal of Stewart for several years, dating back to the time he worked in the Fire Department.

The pension flap emerged last week after Democratic Town Chair John McNamara contended Stewart should have pushed harder for municipal aid and higher levels of Educational Cost Sharing (ECS) from the Governor. McNamara asserted that if Stewart found time to make a strong push for his pension, he should have pushed just as vigorously for a more equitable local aid package with the Governor.

In a June 29th news story Stewart denied he sought any consideration for a bigger pension through the late-filed bill and called Democrats “liars” for saying he did.

New Britain legislators Senator Don DeFronzo, Rep. Tim O’Brien, Rep. John Geragosian and Rep. Peter Tercyak, issued a statement on July 3nd , however, saying Stewart “did use political influence in an effort to increase his own city pension benefits. Stewart clearly stated, to Rep. Tim O’Brien, that he had asked Rep. Williams, a close ally and friend, to introduce the legislation on his behalf. Mayor Stewart’s comments to O’Brien were made during a trip by Mayor Stewart to the State Capitol, on June 5, 2007, the day that the legislation to provide him with the special pension benefit was considered in the State Senate.”

Prior to final action on the pension amendment in the House, the legislators’ statement said that “Mayor Stewart stated, to both Rep. O’Brien and Sen. Donald DeFronzo, that he, Mayor Stewart, would cause working conditions for New Britain city fire fighters to be made worse as a result of the legislature rejecting the special pension legislation that benefited Stewart personally.”

McNamara reiterated his statement that the Mayor should have pushed harder for local aid to reduce the property tax burden and more support for schools with the Governor and other members of his party at the end of the legislative session. “I don’t begrudge him a fair pension and I would even support his service in office as counting for something. But he should pursue that matter openly and cooperatively and in accordance with the rules, not through back-door legislation and intimidation.”